I’ve quit my $16 dollar an hour job after 15 months to be able to work from home at 24 years old, a 2 year old with another on the way. Due to following one of my mentors, telling me that work does not have to be a hassle to my lifestyle. He has given me a great method to be able to work from home to generate more than my bi-weekly paycheck. Which was around $800 dollars a week. Not bad I know, but the actual work was very harsh to any human being ha. He also told me it would only cost my time and effort, only about 3–4 hours a day. So every since I made my transition my life has become a breeze with much less stress physically and financially.
When most people get a raise or have extra money, we look to buy things that are not going to add much to our overall wealth. Money goes to new fancy cars, boats, clothes, you name it. While consumer spending is not necessarily a bad thing, you have to narrow this down, be selective,  and ask yourself, “Will this purchase add value to my financial freedom?” Most likely the answer will be no. I ask myself this almost everytime I get the urge to buy something that I do not necessarily need at the time. This allowed me to free up hundreds of dollars a month that I could put to better use and in places that can provide me with some additional income.
The tradeoff in this scenario is clear. You can continue working to build a bigger pool of savings, which will provide additional income and flexibility for the remainder of your life. Or, you can leave your job as soon as possible and hope that a smaller portfolio will provide sufficient income. It’s all about finding the right balance given your personal situation.
Financial freedom isn’t easy, but you knew that before reading this essay. The exciting part about these five principles is that they apply to anyone, anywhere on the socioeconomic ladder. Whether you earn minimum wage or six-figures, whether you are single or have half-a-dozen children, we have seen these principles work for thousands of individuals—because it’s not about our income level; it’s about the decisions we make with the resources we have.
To do so, donate your most precious asset: your time. Bring your family to a local soup kitchen, foodbank, or homeless shelter. Tutor less-privileged children in your city. Help the elderly with groceries or in-home care. Work on low-income houses with Habitat for Humanity. There are more resources than ever to help you contribute beyond yourself in a meaningful way; just do an Internet search for volunteer opportunities in your area.
Your freedom grows alongside your savings. Eventually, you will have enough money saved to feel comfortable switching jobs, starting a business, returning to school, traveling for a year, or any number of other activities that are impossible to achieve without savings. This stage of financial freedom might include major life changes, but they are not permanent. Your freedom is temporary because your savings will be depleted over time, forcing you to find other sources of income again.
Of course, it’s also important to note that money isn’t the thing that makes you truly rich — it’s the freedom that comes from pursuing whatever brings you joy and provides you will fulfillment that makes you rich. The whole point of financial freedom is that once you become financially free, you have more choices of how to live your life and spend your days.
The doctor or lawyer, for instance, could use her or his income to invest in a medical start-up or buy shares of medical companies he understands such as Johnson & Johnson. Over time, the nature of compounding, dollar cost averaging, and reinvesting dividends can result in her or his portfolio generating substantial passive income. The downside is that it can take decades to achieve enough to truly improve your standard of living. However, it is still the surest path to wealth based on the historical performance of business ownership and stocks.
Being patient has been tough, but I know that I’m on the right track and the more I can save and invest the faster I will reach financial independence. Many of you may be reading this and wonder why I only have $35,000+ in Vanguard savings when I’ve been at this for almost 3 years. But I was starting from not only zero, I owed over $50,000, so I’m excited how far I’ve come in just 3 years! I had to not only invest time building my knowledge, but improve my career to the point where I could make a solid income and side income, and then start investing that money. Now it’s all about patience and optimization.
This might be one of the most important tips when it comes to financial success. Find a mentor or mentors and really pay attention to everything they do. Even if you are unsure if they will work with you, reach out and ask as many questions as you can. You will likely be really surprised by how much older experienced people are willing to teach and help you.
One of the commenters said,”Writing your own eBook and designing your own products can be very rewarding, you just need to get your work in front of an Interested Audience. This may sometimes prove a little more difficult than originally anticipated.” That’s where I am. I have two websites with e-books and products, but I can’t figure out where to advertise or how to promote them. Any ideas would be appreciated.

Our favorite platform for this is RealtyMogul because you get the flexibility to invest as little as $1,000, but can also participate in REITs and private placements – typically not offered to the public. Investors can fund real estate loans to gain passive income or buy an equity share in a property for potential appreciation. Their platform is open to both accredited and non-accredited investors.
To save time and effort, a person can group two or more of their passive activities into one larger activity, provided they form an "appropriate economic unit," according to Publication 925 - Passive Activity and At-Risk Rules. When a taxpayer does this, instead of having to provide material participation in multiple activities, they only have to provide it for the activity as a whole. In addition, if a person includes multiple activities into one group and has to dispose of one of those activities, they’ve only done away with part of a larger activity as opposed to all of a smaller one. 
×